Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 2 Co-diagnoses, diagnostic tests and medications among US emergency department patients with seizure (1993–2003)

From: Seizure visits in US emergency departments: epidemiology and potential disparities in care

Group Sample (n) % (95% confidence interval)
Co-diagnoses
 Alcohol-related 224 6.4 (5.3–7.6)
 Otitis media (unspecified) 103 3.4 (2.6–4.3)
 Hypertension (unspecified) 59 1.4 (0.9–1.8)
 Acute respiratory infection 38 1.4 (0.9–1.9)
 Pneumonia 35 1.2 (0.7–1.7)
 Urinary tract infection 35 1.2 (0.7–1.7)
 Cerebrovascular disease 32 0.8 (0.4–1.2)
 All high-risk co-diagnosesa 217 7.1 (5.9–8.4)
Diagnostic tests
 Neuroimaging (CT or MRI)b 626 24.2 (22.1–26.3)
 Lumbar puncturec 44 2.3 (1.5–3.1)
 EEG 51 4.0 (2.4–5.5)
 Glucose screenc 402 31.3 (27.4–35.3)
Top ten medications
 Phenytoin 1003 29.9 (27.8–32.0)
 Acetaminophen 435 13.0 (11.5–14.6)
 Lorazepam 351 10.5 (9.1–11.8)
 Ibuprofen 252 7.9 (6.6–9.1)
 Phenobarbital 247 7.4 (6.1–8.7)
 Carbamazepine 244 7.8 (6.6–9.0)
 Diazepam 185 6.1 (5.0–7.1)
 Divalproex sodium 154 4.7 (3.7–5.7)
 Ceftriaxone 130 4.2 (3.2–5.2)
 Thiamine 101 2.8 (2.2–3.5)
  1. aIncludes alcohol withdrawal, pneumonia, cerebrovascular disease, hypoglycaemia, septicaemia, hypokalaemia, TIA, hyponatraemia, brain neoplasm and intracranial injury
  2. bData not available for 1993–1994
  3. cData not available for 2001–2003